Lookit is growing! We are now showing links to outside studies along with those happening here on Lookit. Use the tabs above to see activities you can do right now, or scheduled activities you can sign up for.

Please note you'll need a laptop or desktop computer (not a mobile device) running Chrome or Firefox to participate, unless a specific study says otherwise.

Aww... Look at that!

Early Childhood Cognition Lab (Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT))

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For babies ages 9.5 to 10 months

What happens

Your child will see several pairs of pictures of different items (like stuffed animals or baby food) and hear an emotional vocalization (like "aww" or "mmm") that matches just one of the items. We want to see which item your baby chooses to look at!

Purpose

Babies hear emotional expressions all the time, but what expressions do babies understand? This study will help us find out if babies can understand some common vocal emotional expressions such as "aww...", "ohh!", and "mmm..." We will see if babies can differentiate these expressions and match them to a likely cause (such as a stuffed animal, colorful bubbles, or delicious food). Understanding the causes of people’s emotional reactions is fundamental to human relationships, allowing us to empathize with, react to, and predict other people's experiences of the world.

Il tu@ piccol@ sa a cosa stai pensando?

Essex Babylab (University of Essex)

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Per bambini di 18 mesi (+/- 15 giorni)

What happens

In questo studio il tu@ bambin@ guarderà alcuni video che mostrano una persona con una credenza 'vera' o una 'falsa' credenza riguardo a una situazione per un paio di minuti. Mentre il tu@ bambin@ sarà impegnato con i video, chiediamo a te (genitore) di aiutarci a codificare il suo sguardo in tempo reale premendo un tasto sulla tastiera. Vi chiediamo di utilizzare solo il browser Firefox per partecipare a questo studio.

Purpose

La nostra ricerca mira a studiare se i bambini sono in grado di capire fin dalla tenera età che altre persone possono avere credenze diverse riguardo a una situazione rispetto al bambin@ stess@. Questa capacità cognitiva è ben documentata negli adulti ed è chiamata Teoria della Mente. Questo studio utilizza un nuovo metodo per vedere se la Teoria della Mente è presente intorno ai 18 mesi di età. Inoltre è anche il primo studio a chiedere ai genitori di aiutare a codificare lo sguardo dei loro bambini in tempo reale.

Does a smartphone disrupt play time?

Essex Babylab (University of Essex)

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For full term babies aged between 9 and 10 months. The partaking parent needs to own and have access to a smartphone for the study.

What happens

In this study you will be asked to interact with your baby and at certain points during the interaction to carry out some simple tasks on your phone. One of these tasks will involve you making a call to a friend/family member where you talk about the most recent movie/TV series you watched and/or book you read, whilst interacting with your baby. Your baby will also be shown a short video to watch of an adult looking at some toys. Finally you will be asked to complete a short questionnaire about your general phone use.

Purpose

Phones are embedded into our daily lives, but little is known about how a parent using a phone when interacting with their baby influences the interaction. We will be looking to see if phone use changes the way your baby looks at your face and follows where you are looking. For young babies, the parent's eyes are important for communication and we want to see whether babies will still focus on their parent's eyes if the parent is using a phone. This will help us to understand whether parents' using their phones during interactions with their baby may have an impact on their development.

I Spy in the Sea and Sky!

CALC (Rutgers University - New Brunswick)

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For babies ages 18 to 24 months from English-speaking households.

What happens

In this study, your baby will look at varying pictures of animals and hear questions about what they see. We are interested in whether very young children can match the number of animals they see to the number words they hear.

Purpose

We know that children do not fully understand what number words mean until preschool years, but could they have any rough ideas about what number words mean before 2 years of age? We study this question by measuring how long babies look at different numbers of objects (e.g., 2 vs. 4 birds) when hearing a phrase with number words (e.g., "where are two birds?"). This study will help us understand the development of number word knowledge in very young children. Broadly, research on the emergence of number knowledge will help us develop tools to close the gaps in children's later math achievements.

Babies' Attention to Different Races (9-10 month-olds)

Infant Learning & Development Laboratory (University of Chicago)

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For babies ages 9-10 months who were born at full term (37+ weeks) and have not participated in this study before.

What happens

Your child will watch videos of people varying in race/ethnicity. They will be presented side-by-side, either in silence or grasping a toy. We will measure how long your child looks at these videos. We will ask you (the parent) to turn around, close your eyes, or look down to avoid influencing your child's responses. We will also ask you to fill out a demographic survey and answer a few optional questions about your neighborhood.

Purpose

While younger infants usually prefer to look at familiar-race faces relative to unfamiliar-race faces, older infants tend to display an opposite preference. In this study, we are investigating whether these age-related differences persist across a range of races/ethnicities, and how babies’ experience with people from different races/ethnicities influences their attentional preferences. We are also interested in studying how the type of stimuli presented (e.g., still pictures vs. actions) influences babies’ selective attention based on race/ethnicity, with the aim of better understanding the function of these attentional biases.

Looking for more ways to contribute to research from home? Check out Children Helping Science for even more studies!