Eligibility criteria

Youth ages 12-17 years old can participate (with their parent/guardian).

We are unable to include youth who:
• Were born pre-term (<37 weeks gestation)
• Have a history of seizures
• Have a history of neurological or psychiatric disorder, learning disability, or cognitive delay*

*If your child has autism, you can learn about how to participate in this study and other research by visiting the Simons Powering Autism Research (SPARK) website: https://sparkforautism.org/

Duration This study takes about 30-45 minutes to complete, including a caregiver questionnaire (5-10 minutes, parent only) and five different interactive screen-based games that will measure how your child interacts with moving objects (25-30 minutes, child with caregiver present).
Compensation

Your child will receive compensation in the form of an Amazon gift card valued at $18 for each game session that they complete. We will email the gift card within 2 week of completion of the study. If your child is not eligible, they will still have the opportunity to play the games if desired; in this case their data would not be used. However, we are unable to provide compensation for those individuals who are ineligible for the study.

What happens

First, you will be asked to complete a brief questionnaire about your child’s health and development to determine if they are eligible for this study. If your child is eligible, your child may be asked to participate in up to five games that test their abilities to interact with moving objects. We ask that you stay in the room while your child completes the games. We also ask that you do not help them play by making suggestions, reacting to their performance, discussing strategy, or demonstrating the games. It does not matter how well your child does each task; it is more important that they try their best. We will help your child understand the tasks by showing them pictures, demonstrating, and asking them to practice the tasks briefly.

What we're studying

This study’s goal is to learn about the abilities of children with and without autism spectrum disorder to interact with moving objects. The study will investigate whether children with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder perform differently than children who are typically developing in activities that involve catching, bouncing, or reacting to a moving object. If we are successful, then the results could inform future studies of autism, improve diagnosis, and may even potentially deliver therapeutic interventions that may help children improve their motor skills and other abilities.

This study is conducted by Dagmar Sternad and Pawan Sinha (contact : pairs@mit.edu)

Would you like to participate in this study?

Log in to participate